Lac La Croix pony saved from extinction by the Ojibwe

“Once upon a time, before the last Ice Age, horses galloped across the North American landscape. But when the Laurentide Ice Sheet pressed its way across the continent, before retreating some 11,000 years ago, the horses ran away, trying to keep a pace ahead of that cold front. Entire herds slipped across the Bering land bridge in the far northwest, where Alaska met Siberia, and the horse vanished from North America. It wouldn’t come back until around the year 1500, when European explorers, settlers, invaders, colonizers — however you see them — brought horses on their ships. Or so the history goes.”

Susan Nerberg – Broadview – October 2019

He was a scoundrel with a jealous wife and a troubled mistress. He made the deal of a lifetime — then vanished

“I first learned about Ambrose Small when I was exploring the Path, the labyrinth of shops and food courts underneath the downtown core. I was on assignment for the Star and I wondered if there were any mysteries connected to the place. I was told the story of Ambrose Small and the Grand Opera House, the long-demolished theatre on Adelaide St. that was once the toast of Toronto’s entertainment scene.”

Katie Daubs – Toronto Star – September 2019

The long history of ‘go back to where you came from’ in Canada

“Three years later, the government amended the Immigration Act. Legal recourse against unwelcome newcomers was beefed up with something more actionable than just fines: they could now set foot on Canadian soil, but only temporarily, until the Canadian government could send them back ‘from whence they came.’ The government had officially legalized deportation. Not suitable for Canada? We don’t want you—go back to where you came from. It’s the law.”

Michael Fraiman – Maclean’s – August 2019

A Second World War mystery solved

 
Eric Reguly – The Globe and Mail – July 2019

D-Day confidential

“Half an hour after they had set foot on French soil on D-Day, Sapper John Schaupmeyer and his fellow combat engineers remained stranded on the beach, pinned down by German machine guns, mortars and artillery. From the cover of a seawall, they saw an LCI, one of the larger models of landing craft, touch ground. Soldiers aboard tried to disembark but the rough waves tangled up their gangway. Trapped on the LCI deck, the men came under enemy fire. At that moment, one of the combat engineers, Sapper Walter Coveyduck, left the seawall’s protection to go save the men of the LCI.”

Tu Thanh Ha – The Globe and Mail – June 2019

When Terror Came to Canada

“That first surge of 1,200 provincial and Montreal city police dragged 238 suspects into custody within the first eight hours of the act’s proclamation. Nearly 500 were swept into detention and 4,600 searches were conducted for weapons and subversive materials in the weeks before authorities finally conceded an armed insurrection in Quebec was, in fact, unlikely. The dragnet, along with the dispatch of 10,000 combat-equipped troops to help guard Montreal, Quebec City, and Ottawa, remains one of the most controversial moments in modern Canadian ­history.”

Brian Stewart – Literary Review of Canada – January 2019

Know Your History, Know Your Greatness

 
Eternity Martis – Hazlitt – July 2016